Uncategorized

Can robotics create manufacturing jobs?

While robotics in manufacturing is not an utopian concept otherwise conceptualised, they are all about productivity and what they could to manufacturing
 The growth story of the country in the last decade has been a one of both success stories and bumpy rides. It would be surprising to learn that in a country like India where the availability of manpower and labour are in abundance, robotics could find itself to become a lucrative industry. Industry experts suggest that robotics will continue to flourish in the manufacturing areas, especially in automation where it will be used to perform tasks that require less skill.
When computers came, they basically called for a new skill set. Robotics too like computers will drive the industry and will call for an augmentation of skills or a creation of new skill-set for workers. Although, human capital plays an important role, jobs that attribute to unskilled labour or requiring relatively less skill will be done by robotics. Even though human capital is indispensible it does not go without saying that jobs that are heavily mechanised could involve robotics. Advances in technology coupled with integrated technology will give rise to development of robotics. As the demand for technology in various sectors increases, robotics will have a key role to play. While robotics in manufacturing is not an utopian concept otherwise conceptualised, they are all about productivity and what they could to manufacturing.
Market trends in manufacturing As there are improvements in the market and as manufacturing activities are set to rise, robotics will play a crucial role in automation. Market trends suggest that robotics will continue to play a crucial role in automation. In a labour intensive economy, robotics will have a role to play as manufacturers will see value in investing and deploying robots as their initial cost is offset within a few months of deployment.
While market trends are usually shaped by several factors, it is necessary to understand that in manufacturing sometimes new technologies work well and are adopted by the industry when they result in increase in productivity and growth of economy.
Role of robotics in creating jobsRajesh Nath, Managing Director, German Engineering Federation (VDMA) India Office has some interesting points to share. Speaking on the role of robotics in the manufacturing industry he tells that most of the manufacturing companies in India already have their in-house training facilities to train their workforce to be tech savvy with industrial machines. This is a trend set especially by MNC’s where technically skilled workforce are trained from the beginning to accelerate growth for the industry.
Speaking of the engineering colleges, Mr. Nath says that with ‘Mechatronics’ becoming an integral part of the curriculum in engineering courses, it has become mandatory for colleges to give students a hands-on training with machines. So, by the time that they graduate they are well accustomed to use them. “This training has helped the manufacturing sector as it has made the students more job-ready and increased the availability of skilled manpower to the industry,” he adds.
Raj Singh Rathee, Managing Director, KUKA Robotics India Pvt. Ltd. tells us that robots can create manufacturing jobs in India but we need to look at it from different perspectives: One is the direct jobs created by installing robots in manufacturing. Like all other machines even robots need human beings to install, program, and run and maintain them. The second aspect is the use of robots to ensure a consistent and high quality manufacturing. This increases the business potential of the companies using robots as compared to the ones not using robots. With an improved market and better business prospects, companies progress and employ more people at various levels. It is to be noted that robots can do work where humans will find it strenuous to work especially in difficult and harsh working environment. This is another indirect way of job creation.
Optimism and opportunities from “Make in India” initiative   Mr Nath tells us that with the “Make in India” initiative, Prime Minister Narendra Modi has brought the focus of global investors on making India a manufacturing hub. While manufacturing accounts for only 15 per cent of India’s GDP it witnessed a 0.7 per cent contraction in 2013-14. Thus the Prime Minister’s thrust on the sector is well founded. It is quite evident that relevant policies are likely to be announced to facilitate growth of this sector. Manufacturing sector growth is a key factor for sustained economic growth. Also, the sector is not just dependent on demands and investments but also on the solutions and technologies that help to enhance operational excellence of a manufacturing facility. Various shortcomings have led to a rate of technology adoption that has not been uniform. In the current context, with renewed industry confidence and a new, stable government at the centre, the country has manufacturing prospects as the economic growth is expected to get a major boost.
Speaking of the “Make in India” initiative, Mr Rathee, KUKA says that robots can increase the manufacturing capacity but the economics factors of volume and quality will come into play. Therefore, more robots will be required in some cases.
Role of industry in creating jobs through roboticsRobotics and automation are reaching a new dimension with man-machine cooperation. Robots are handling work in the place of people whenever or wherever they become monotonous, injurious to health or require no special job skills. This makes workplaces more productive, flexible and ergonomic in nature. “The industry now looks forward to the fourth industrial revolution also termed as Industry 4.0 in Germany wherein manufacturing would be combined with technology leading to a smart factory concept characterised by adaptability, resource efficiency and ergonomics as well as the integration of customers and business partners in business and value processes,” Mr Nath said.
With regards to employment and job creation, Mr Rathee says that KUKA has been preparing engineers towards better employability by working to educate them on robots and robot based technologies for nearly a decade now. Apart from running its own training centre, there are training facilities at various engineering colleges and universities. The engineers have a better job prospect with this knowledge. “More engineers are required for the robotic-based solutions as robot-based solution will require hardware and software applications which have to be manufactured and programmed. This will lead to a creation of jobs,” Mr Rathee concludes. ______________________________________More engineers are required for the robotic-based solutions as robot-based solution will require hardware and software applications which have to be manufactured and programmed.
Raj Singh Rathee, MD, KUKA Robotics India_________________________________________________
Robotics and automation are reaching a new dimension with man-machine cooperation.
Rajesh Nath, Managing Director, German Engineering Federation (VDMA) India

Click to comment

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

Most Popular

To Top